WiHM: Here Are Some Badass Female Horror Writers

Hey there, Creepy Peeps! Happy Women in Horror Month! All February, I’ll be celebrating kick-ass, amazing and inspiring women in horror of all sorts! I thought I would list some awesome female horror writers to start off. If you have any to add (because I know for a fact that I am missing some, I just may not be familiar with them), please let me know in the comments and I’ll add them to this list!

 Mary Shelley

Mary Shelley

This complete badass wrote one of the most famous gothic horror novels of all time, Frankenstein (or The Modern Prometheus, 1818) when she was just eighteen! Not only that but our homegirl, Mary, wrote this for fun! I’m sure you all know the story of how Frankenstein came to life, I’ll sum it up quick. Basically, Mary was hanging at her friend’s, Lord Byron’s, house with her beau, Percy; it got all rainy out, and they started telling scary stories, so Byron suggested they write their own ghost stories to scare each other. I think it’s safe to say Mary won that one.

 Shirley Jackson

Shirley Jackson

I posted a video on Ms. Jackson over on Morbidly Beautiful’s YouTube channel, you can watch it here! In the video I talk a little bit about Shirley’s life and her career, you should check it out! Anyway, this savage had to juggle taking care of her children and being a writer at a time when she wasn’t being recognized as such. I know, it’s some bullshit. Jackson’s first short story, “The Lottery,” had some people thinking the story was real (which if you don’t know what “The Lottery” is about, go read it, it’s very good). Jackson has also written The Haunting of Hill House, my personal favorite, which has been adapted into a film twice!

 Anne Rice

Anne Rice

Most of you are probably familiar with Anne Rice’s work, her most popular books have got to be her Vampire Chronicles novels (Interview with the Vampire, The Vampire Lestat, The Queen of the Damned, plus nine more titles). Interview with the Vampire was actually Rice’s first novel and it was received so poorly that she quit the supernatural game for a while. Fucking haters. Interview was completed following the death of Rice’s daughter from acute granulocytic leukemia; months before this event, Rice described having a dream about her daughter dying from something in her blood. Creeeepy. Rice didn’t return to the supernatural genre until almost a decade later with The Vampire Lestat, and I think I speak for everyone when I say we’re damn happy she did; those books kick ass.

 Dion Fortune

Dion Fortune

This kick-ass, do-it-all lady was a British occultist, Christian Qabalist, ceremonial magician, novelist, and author. Well, now I feel inferior. Fortune wrote a total of seven novels, four of which were occult-themed and the remaining three were romantic thrillers under a pen name, V.M. Steele. A true woman of horror, all of Fortune’s novels featured a heroine – assertive and magically powerful – who meets a man and saves him from himself (right on, homegirl). On top of all of that, this witchy woman is considered one of the forerunners in the creation and rise of modern Wicca.

 Asa Nonami

Asa Nonami

Asa Nonami is a popular Japanese horror and crime writer, known for her strong female characters in a genre that is dominated by male characters. There is sadly very little information about Nonami that I can find (which seriously messed up) because this badass has won multiple awards for her work and is a prolific writer. Some of her works include The Hunter, The June 19th BrideParadise ThirtyDramatic Children, Murderer of the Blooming Season, and Body.

 Tananarive Due

Tananarive Due

I have to give props to this Florida native (hey girl hey!), author and educator. Due’s work ranges from science fiction (her African Immortals series) to novels dealing with the Civil Rights movement. This lady does it all, y’all! Due truly began her writing career while working for the Miami Herald; she interviewed Anne Rice and was inspired to finally pursue her dream of being a novelist. Hell yeah. Once again, most of Due’s bios on the Internet are disappointingly short (ugh). Some of Due’s popular works include My Soul to Keep, The Living Blood, The Good House, Blood Colony, Ghost Summer: Stories, and The Between.

Visit womeninhorrormonth.com for more WiHM goodness and remember to let me know of any other great female horror writers in the comments so I can add them to the list!